Radiocarbon dating of metal

Some clays are hardly thermoluminescent at all; some may not have a straight-line relationship between dose and TL; spurious luminescence due to chemical or pressure effects may mask the radiation-induced TL; occasionally, a condition called "anomalous fading", where part of the TL is unstable, may lessen the accuracy of the dose measurement.

Generally speaking, when a sample is drilled and there is no information available about the burial environment, one may expect up to 40 per cent uncertainty.

While not so accurate as radiocarbon dating, which cannot date pottery (except from soot deposits on cooking pots), TL has found considerable usefulness in the authenticity of ceramic art objects where high precision is not necessary.

Since the university laboratories involved with TL are research facilities, they generally will not accept art objects for authentication on a routine basis.

Heated stone material, such as hearths, pot boilers, and burnt flints, has been dated as well.

Most porcelain dating is done for insurance purposes on broken objects.Unfortunately, it is not possible to achieve this precision for the majority of art objects.Among the reasons for this is the small amount of material that may be taken for testing.It was employed in the 1950's as a method for radiation dose measurement, and soon was proposed for archaeological dating.By the mid-1960's, its validity as an absolute dating technique was established by workers at Oxford and Birmingham in England, Riso in Denmark, and at the University of Pennsylvania in the U. The Research Laboratory for Archaeology at Oxford, in particular, has played a major role in TL research.

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